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PEACEST 3D03 Globalization And Peace

Academic Year: Fall 2016

Term: Fall

Day/Evening: D

Instructor: Dr. Nancy Doubleday

Email: doublen@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 312

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23087

Website:

Office Hours: Wednesday 2:30-3:30PM in UH 304 and 4-5PM in TSH 312



Course Objectives:

Investigation: To do this, we will examine case studies, consult with practitioners and theoretical experts; and explore and formulate systemic frameworks to better understand:

1. globalization and its influence on present and previous conflicts, including the marginalization of Indigenous People globally through 500+ years of colonial practice;

2. multiple ways in which globalization links global forces and local outcomes, and

3. alternative views of globalization that may be helpful in adapting structural and institutional norms toward conditions, practices and outcomes capable of greater contributions to peace, sustainability, health and justice.

 

Strategic Action: We will collaborate with current research program network nodes at McMaster, including that of the Water-Network, and Participedia[1] and Ocean Canada[2] partnerships, to deepen our knowledge of case-based decision-making.

 

Individually, in groups and in the class as a whole, we will acquire capabilities through skill and design development, in the practice, creation, and communication of:

1. case studies to promote peace, health, social justice and sustainability;

2. frameworks for evaluation (objective and reflexive); and

3. systemic interventions and service.

 

For our projects, we will select a small number of global challenges and bring our collective resources into play to address these challenges, including designing strategies and taking action to change those situations we are concerned about in thoughtful and responsible ways.

 

We will also develop our capacity to reflect on our analysis and our actions and to evaluate and report on the outcomes of our interventions. The best way to intensify the learning experience is to immerse ourselves as learners in the problem: problem-based learning (PBL) is a McMaster strength, and we will adopt this approach in this course. Borrowing from health sciences, we will apply these social determinants to the larger questions of peace and globalization, using approaches drawn from PBL.

 

We recognize the need to acquire the skills and capacities to move from global concerns to local actions and back to global outcomes. We also need to understand the interconnectedness of all issues: recognition of human rights, water and natural resource sustainability, urbanization, climate change, migration, conflict, and growing numbers of refugees are all related to one another in causes and consequences, and we will develop tools for analysis and for communication to bring these issues to greater social awareness locally.

 

Transformative Learning: Globalizing Peace/Pacifying Globalization

 

This year our class project will focus on practical aid for people suffering from forced migration and in the; and on the processes for development of capacities and strategies for building effective responses. Displacement and forced migration result in flows of refugees in the context of globalization. How can this process of displacement be transformed? Elements of such strategies will include reduction of violence and increased peace promotion and building, and enhanced sustainable development possibilities and/or economic activities, in alignment with the triple bottom line (i.e. meeting objectives of economic viability, ecological sustainability and social justice and equity). The processes of globalization have been critically addressed in many fields and we seek to move on from an awareness of these critiques, to strategic and tactical responses to bring about change.

Investigation and Discovery: Gathering the Evidence

 

We anticipate access to a new learning environment opportunity in 2016 for this course, and so have developed a new format for PeaceSt 3D03, based on the expectation of the availability of real-time support for discovery and problem solving through group-enabling technology and classroom architecture. We will learn to consider a range of sources: specific readings, guest speakers, archival holdings and extra-curricular opportunities have been identified to advance the course themes and deepen our experience.

 

We will also engage with community initiatives, both local and international, and will participate in community-based service and learning opportunities, as part of the process of grounding our activities.

 

This year we will work with particular emphasis on local-global relationships, and will focus on designing a collective class contribution in the form of an action plan for educational support for local and global refugees in addition to more conventional course products.

 

The course will use student-centred learning processes, including action learning, drawing on group work and project based learning strategies. The course themes will be offered as modules and students will work in interest groups within the course themes throughout the term to conduct student projects.

 

Assignments, Evaluation and Due Dates

There are 3 assignments. Participation is the fourth head of evaluation. Each individual will create the following learning products:

 

1. Applying the SDGS to Globalizing Peace:

 

This assignment is the first step from defining concepts to designing strategic action.

Requirements: Find a definition of globalization and a definition of peace, then link these definitions to make a statement about action necessary to achieve one of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Include these definitions,(no more than 100 words each) with complete references to sources  in your submission. Then apply the definitions of the terms you selected to your SDG (see Avenue 2 Learn) and propose 2 recommendations for action and for policy change (no more than 600 words) needed in order to use globalization as a force for peace in relation to your SDG.

 

Total word length permitted: 800 words. Weight: 25% Due: September 26, 2016. Submit the hard copy in class and deposit the digital copy on A2L.

 

2. Preparing Issue Briefs/ Case Studies:

 

In a team with 3-5 others:

 

Identify an issue where you believe action has been taken successfully to address a problem resulting from globalization (e.g. refugees and migration, human trafficking, child labour, illegal trade in endangered species, others).

Write one draft case study according to the Participedia guidelines (see http://participedia.net/) (based on your team review of the literature and online sources related to the situation you have chosen, whether contemporary or historical) describing participation (state, citizen or non-state actor) in a decision-making situation (whether seen as “good” or not) for the Participedia database.

Follow the Participedia template and look at several examples before uploading materials in A2L.

 

 

 

 

Total word length permitted: 800 words. Weight: 25% Due: October 24, 2016. Submit one hard copy for each team in class on October 3 and deposit the digital copy on A2L. Be sure to put a title on your document and to list all contributing team members (names & student ID numbers).

 

 

3. Class Project: Developing Strategic Plans for Change

 

Design, draft and document proposals for effective responses to the needs of refugees in relation to higher education in Hamilton AND develop an implementation plan and document at least ONE of your proposals.

 

Task: make a substantive contribution to the completion of the class project to support refugees seeking higher education locally.

 

Students will work in self-selected groups around topics of mutual interest within the theme of refugees. Class time will be made available for Group formation in weeks 1 to 3. The results of these projects will be presented at an appropriate venue during Week 11-13.

In addition each sub-group will prepare a Project Report Executive Summary:

Total word length permitted (4500 words, plus appendices) (i.e. 10pp+Appendices). weight: 25% Due December 1.

 

4. Class Participation 25%:

 

Class Participation grade will be based on:

1) Attendance at class activities: workshops, seminars, classes, and group project meetings; (10%)

2) Active participation in class and project discussions (5%), and

3) Peer to peer evaluations of class project participation (10%).


[1] http://participedia.net/

[2] http://oceancanada.org/


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

No prescriberd text: online and in-library materials.


Method of Assessment:

There are 3 assignments. Participation is the fourth head of evaluation. Each individual will create the following learning products:

 

1. Applying the SDGS to Globalizing Peace:

 

This assignment is the first step from defining concepts to designing strategic action.

Requirements: Find a definition of globalization and a definition of peace, then link these definitions to make a statement about action necessary to achieve one of the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Include these definitions,(no more than 100 words each) with complete references to sources  in your submission. Then apply the definitions of the terms you selected to your SDG (see Avenue 2 Learn) and propose 2 recommendations for action and for policy change (no more than 600 words) needed in order to use globalization as a force for peace in relation to your SDG.

 

Total word length permitted: 800 words. Weight: 25% Due: September 26, 2016. Submit the hard copy in class and deposit the digital copy on A2L.

 

2. Preparing Issue Briefs/ Case Studies:

 

In a team with 3-5 others:

 

Identify an issue where you believe action has been taken successfully to address a problem resulting from globalization (e.g. refugees and migration, human trafficking, child labour, illegal trade in endangered species, others).

Write one draft case study according to the Participedia guidelines (see http://participedia.net/) (based on your team review of the literature and online sources related to the situation you have chosen, whether contemporary or historical) describing participation (state, citizen or non-state actor) in a decision-making situation (whether seen as “good” or not) for the Participedia database.

Follow the Participedia template and look at several examples before uploading materials in A2L.

 

 

 

 

Total word length permitted: 800 words. Weight: 25% Due: October 24, 2016. Submit one hard copy for each team in class on October 3 and deposit the digital copy on A2L. Be sure to put a title on your document and to list all contributing team members (names & student ID numbers).

 

 

3. Class Project: Developing Strategic Plans for Change

 

Design, draft and document proposals for effective responses to the needs of refugees in relation to higher education in Hamilton AND develop an implementation plan and document at least ONE of your proposals.

 

Task: make a substantive contribution to the completion of the class project to support refugees seeking higher education locally.

 

Students will work in self-selected groups around topics of mutual interest within the theme of refugees. Class time will be made available for Group formation in weeks 1 to 3. The results of these projects will be presented at an appropriate venue during Week 11-13.

In addition each sub-group will prepare a Project Report Executive Summary:

Total word length permitted (4500 words, plus appendices) (i.e. 10pp+Appendices). weight: 25% Due December 1.

 

4. Class Participation 25%:

 

Class Participation grade will be based on:

1) Attendance at class activities: workshops, seminars, classes, and group project meetings; (10%)

2) Active participation in class and project discussions (5%), and

3) Peer to peer evaluations of class project participation (10%).


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

2) Attendance

 

Attendance is expected and it is in your interest to join us. In the case of a strike we will make accommodations.

 

3) Submission of Assignments and Late Submissions:

 

Assignments are due in class or at other times, according to the assignment instructions. Please check the individual assignment sheet for details on submission requirements for each assignment.

 

Assignments will not be accepted in the Department of Philosophy Office, the Office of Peace Studies or under my office door. Thank you!

 

4) Medical Emergencies

 

Extensions will be granted for medical emergencies with a doctor’s note. Be sure to see your doctor or go to on-campus health services if you are ill. If you are sneezing, coughing or have a temperature, please do not come to class.

 

5) Other Emergencies

 

If other extenuating circumstances arise, please notify me or the Office of Peace Studies or the Faculty of Humanities Advising Office, as soon as possible to make arrangements.

 

6) Late Penalties

 

Penalties for late assignments without extensions will be 2% per day, including weekends.

 

7) Copies and Back-up

 

You must retain copies of all work submitted, both in hard copy and digital form. Back-up of computer files must be done on a regular basis and neglecting to perform backing up is not an acceptable reason for failing to hand in your work.

 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

1) Course Material – No Required Text:

 

Reading and viewing materials will be assigned in class and identified through your projects. Online resources will be used whenever possible. When weekly readings are assigned, please complete the assigned readings BEFORE your class.


Other Course Information:

We welcome students from across the university - and beyond - who share an interest in moving toward a kinder, gentler world with greater prospects for peace, health, justice and sustainability.