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PEACEST 4FC3 Experiential Learning

Academic Year: Spring/Summer 2016

Term: Spring

Day/Evening: E

Instructor: Dr. Nancy Doubleday

Email: doublen@mcmaster.ca

Office: Togo Salmon Hall 312

Phone: 905-525-9140 x 23087

Website:

Office Hours: 5-6 PM M, T, W, Th



Course Objectives:

Peace, Water and Health: Fostering Local and Global Engagement

Course Outline Spring 2016

Field Course Leaders: Jacob Brodka, Nancy Doubleday and Rodrigo Narro Perez

Emails: brodkajm@mcmaster.ca, doublen@mcmaster.ca, narrora@mcmaster.ca

Room(s): To Be Determined

Course Description and Objectives

Intensive experiential learning: examining theory and practice in situ through action learning and/or action research. Preparatory instruction on campus will precede field work and/ or travel. Students and project-partners will explore problem-based learning opportunities.

This field course will explore solutions to local and global issues pertaining to the intersectionality of several socioeconomic and environmental factors, including but not limited to: water, public health, the environment and conflict. Solutions will encompass innovative policy, industry practice and sustainable development in ocean and non-ocean regions of Canada. Results will support greater peace, health, equity and sustainability.

Although we live on what is arguably Canada’s “fourth Coast”, the Great Lakes Basin region, a significant proportion of Canadians lack direct contact with ocean coasts. This lack of direct exposure is a barrier to instilling a sense of appreciation and understanding of the inevitability of cumulative impacts of land-based sources of pollution on the oceans. By considering the interactions amongst human activity, social justice, freshwater, oceans and climate, we will find interconnections that empower us to take action. Students will develop a sense of personal agency through critical thinking and inquiry into the socioeconomic and environmental implications of local actions, as they relate to global and cross-regional stakeholders.

Addressing these and other issues requires a holistic approach. Through a combination of research and outreach, we seek to understand and address the overall impacts of our changing global environment on marine and freshwater ecosystems, and ecosystem services. Case studies, such as the Flint, Michigan water crisis and Canada’s fishing industry will be examined throughout the course.

This is an experiential learning course that will allow students to apply their skills in a practical way: project design, proposal writing, topic development, oral and writing communication skills, community engagement.


Textbooks, Materials & Fees:

Materials will be provided. There is a $50.00 course fee payable on the first day, Saturday May 28.

Compressed Course Schedule:

This course is a compressed experiential learning course that will have course instruction from May 28th - June 5th. Some deliverables will be handed in after June 5th. Work and instruction is equivalent to a full-term course, however due to length of course, expectations will be adjusted to ensure that learning objectives are successfully met by all participants. Student participation and engagement is expected in all aspects of the course.

 


Method of Assessment:

Course Assessment

 

Participation - 25% of final mark

As a fourth year experiential course, every student is expected to participate in class. Class participation is achieved through a variety of forms, but in general, is conversation and questions that contribute positively to the class and learning of others.

 

 

News Article Commentary - 15% of final mark

Each student will pick a news article (which was written no less than a month ago) that is relevant to any aspect of the course’s content. An  Field Course Leader of the course must approve the news article before the student can write their commentary. The article should be roughly 1000-1250 words.

Further instruction will be giving during the course.

 

Class Project (3 Components) - 50% of final mark

The majority of this course will be structured around a group project (each group will have 1-3 members) that explores a unique issue related to the intersectionality of peace, health and water. This project will also expose student to concepts of community engagement.

Class project topics will involve research requested by, or of interest to, community organizations in Hamilton, Ontario. Through this project, students will have the opportunity to apply learned concepts while contributing to the research capacity of various local organizations.

Potential project topics include:

  • Assist the Bay Area Restoration Council in finding information on project impacts and mitigation to climate change as it relates to the Hamilton Harbour watershed.
  • Assist Hamilton Water: in assessing how to change the way in which Canadians view and use water resources; how does Hamilton Water assess what the community views as ‘vital’ services.
  • Explore lead in water in Hamilton: what is the current water infrastructure of Hamilton, what socio-economic factors are at play in Hamilton? What comparisons exist between Hamilton and Flint?
  • What are injustices and social issues related to water provision?

More project topics will be discussed once class starts.

 

The form of this project will vary depending on the nature of the topic and deliverables.

Component 1: Project Proposal - 5%

Each group will create a project proposal (2 pages maximum) that will introduce the topic of their respective project, methodology, and desired outcomes.

Due at midnight on May 29th - date is subject to change.

Component 2: Topic Seminar - 10%

Each group will be expected to present a 15 minute seminar to the class that introduces the topic of their project to the rest of the class.

Seminars will occur on June 4th.

Component 3: Final Project Deliverable - 35%

Each group will have different deliverables. Final deliverables may take the form of a written report, a policy brief, a presentation geared towards the community, a video, etc.

To ensure a quality deliverable, due date may be after April 10th.

 

Written Reflections - 10% (Pass/ Fail)

Each student will be expected to submit short written reflections (350 - 500 words) after certain aspects of the course, such as a field trip or workshop. A total of two written reflections will be submitted throughout the course. Due dates will be given once the course starts.

 


Policy on Missed Work, Extensions, and Late Penalties:

Missed or Late Work:

 

If you miss a due date for a legitimate reason you must file documentation. You can report absences that last up to 5 days using the McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF). Please see the section titled ‘McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)’ for further information. Do not bring a doctor’s note to your Field Course Leader.

           

Late assignments, without justification, will be assigned a penalty of 25% per day of lateness.

 

Your marks for a missed assignment may be applied to the final assignment OR you may be given a short extension. You must contact your Field Course Leader to find out what accommodations, if any, will be made for a missed assignment. Failure to contact the  Field Course Leader to discuss accommodations within 5 days of the due date results in a grade of zero on the assignment. No penalties will be applied to material submitted late with justification.

 

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF):

If you are absent from the university for a minor medical reason, lasting fewer than 3 days, you may report your absence, once per term, without documentation, using the McMaster Student Absence Form. Absences for a longer duration or for other reasons must be reported to your Faculty/Program office, with documentation, and relief from term work may not necessarily be granted. When using the MSAF, report your absence to any of the  Field Course Leaders: Jacob Brodka, Nancy Doubleday and Rodrigo Narro Perez. You must contact an  Field Course Leader immediately (normally within 2 working days) by email at brodkajm@mcmaster.ca, doublen@mcmaster.ca, narrora@mcmaster.ca to learn what relief may be granted for the work, if any, you have missed, and relevant details such as revised deadlines, or time and location of a make-up evaluation. Please note that the MSAF may not be used for term work worth 25% or more, nor can it be used for the final examination.

Please note: students who use the MSAF, but who do not contact the  Field Course Leader within the 2 working days period, may not be granted any relief. Also assignments in the class with assigned for numerous weeks may not be accommodated. Check with the TA and/or  Field Course Leader.

Avenue to Learn (A2L):

 

URL: http://avenue.mcmaster.ca

 

A2L is an online system that will be used in this class for communicating information relating to the course (e.g. lecture notes, etc.). To log in to A2L, use your MOSAIC login and password. See the A2L home page above for more instructions if you need them. It is the student’s responsibility to check A2L regularly (i.e. AT LEAST twice a week) for updates.

 

Students should be aware that when they access the electronic components of this course, private information such as first and last names, user names for the McMaster e-mail accounts, and program affiliation may become apparent to all other students in the same course. The available information is dependent on the technology used. Continuation in this course will be deemed consent to this disclosure. If you have any questions or concerns about such disclosure please discuss this with the course  Field Course Leader.

 

If you encounter any technical problems with this service go to the following website for support: http://avenue.mcmaster.ca/help/. Please note that it is not the responsibility of the teaching staff of PEACE ST 4CF3 to assist you with A2L issues.

 

Mark Appeals and A2L Grades

 

You will have one week (i.e. 7 days) from the date that marks for an evaluation are released to appeal your mark. If you wish to appeal a mark for a class assignment you must email (to any  Field Course Leader) your assignment along with a rationale (including your name, McMaster email address, and student ID number) justifying why you wish to have the class assignment looked at again. In any case, if the request is found to be insufficiently justified (e.g. simply wanting a higher mark is insufficient), the matter will not be further investigated. Remember that a re-submitted paper is entirely regraded meaning the grade can go up or down.

 

Your marks will be recorded on A2L. It is your responsibility to check that all marks entered into A2L are recorded properly. You must notify the  Field Course Leader about any errors with regards to how your marks are entered. You have until 48 hours prior to the final exam to report any A2L mark issues.

 


Please Note the Following Policies and Statements:

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: "Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty"), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

  1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.
  2. Improper collaboration in group work.
  3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Email correspondence policy

It is the policy of the Faculty of Humanities that all email communication sent from students to instructors (including TAs), and from students to staff, must originate from each student’s own McMaster University email account. This policy protects confidentiality and confirms the identity of the student.  Instructors will delete emails that do not originate from a McMaster email account.

Modification of course outlines

The University reserves the right to change dates and/or deadlines etc. for any or all courses in the case of an emergency situation or labour disruption or civil unrest/disobedience, etc. If a modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with an explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. Any significant changes should be made in consultation with the Department Chair.

McMaster Student Absence Form (MSAF)

In the event of an absence for medical or other reasons, students should review and follow the Academic Regulation in the Undergraduate Calendar Requests for Relief for Missed Academic Term Work. Please note these regulations have changed beginning Fall 2015. You can find information at mcmaster.ca/msaf/. If you have any questions about the MSAF, please contact your Associate Dean's office.

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University's Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities.

Academic Accommodation for Religious, Indigenous and Spiritual Observances

Students requiring academic accommodation based on religion and spiritual observances should follow the procedures set out in the Course Calendar or by their respective Faculty. In most cases, the student should contact his or her professor or academic advisor as soon as possible to arrange accommodations for classes, assignments, tests and examinations that might be affected by a religious holiday or spiritual observance.


Topics and Readings:

Course Schedule

 

PLEASE NOTE: This course schedule is tentative and subject to change

 

Date

Content/Activities

Deliverables

Saturday May 28th

9:00 am - 5:30 pm

- Course Introduction

- Exploration of Cootes Paradise

- Group Selection

 

Sunday May 29th

9:00 am - 5:30 pm

- Site Visit to City of Hamilton’s Drinking Water Plant

- Exploration of Hamilton Harbour

- Project Consultation

 

11:59 pm

   Project Proposal due

Monday May 30th

6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

- Lecture

 

Tuesday May 31st

6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

- TBD

11:59 pm

   1st reflection due

Wednesday June 1st

6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

- Guest Lecture with Dr. Yanna Lambrinidou - The Flint Water Crisis

 

Thursday June 2nd

6:00 pm - 8:30 pm

- Lecture

 

Friday June 3rd

- No class

11:59 pm

News Article

comm entary due

Saturday June 4th

9:00 am - 5:30 pm

- Seminar Presentations

11:59 pm

   2nd reflection due

Sunday June 5th

9:00 am - 5:30 pm

- Course wrap-up / celebration

 

 

Some deliverables may be submitted after June 5th. Details to follow once course instruction begins. 


Other Course Information:

REMINDER: This course is a compressed experiential learning course that will have course instruction from May 28th - June 5th. Some deliverables will be handed in after June 5th. Work and instruction is equivalent to a full-term course, however due to length of course, expectations will be adjusted to ensure that learning objectives are successfully met by all participants. Student participation and engagement is expected in all aspects of the course.

Student Conduct

Students’ behaviour in all aspects of this course should meet the standards of the McMaster University Student Code of Conduct. Any inappropriate behaviour directed against any of your colleagues, T.A, or the Field Course Leader will not be tolerated. Disruptive behaviour during lectures will also not be tolerated.

This also means that the A2L Discussion Board is an extension of the classroom. These spaces are to be considered inclusive and safe. Abuse, ridicule, slander, inappropriate language, and discrimination towards the Field Course Leader, teaching staff, and other students will not be tolerated in any capacity. This may lead to various disciplinary measures including, but not limited to, removal of access privileges to the A2L for PEACE ST 4CF3.

 

Academic Dishonesty

You are expected to exhibit honesty and use ethical behaviour in all aspects of the learning process. Academic credentials you earn are rooted in principles of honesty and academic integrity.

Academic dishonesty is to knowingly act or fail to act in a way that results or could result in unearned academic credit or advantage. This behaviour can result in serious consequences, e.g. the grade of zero on an assignment, loss of credit with a notation on the transcript (notation reads: “Grade of F assigned for academic dishonesty”), and/or suspension or expulsion from the university.

It is your responsibility to understand what constitutes academic dishonesty. For information on the various types of academic dishonesty please refer to the Academic Integrity Policy, located at: http://www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity

The following illustrates only three forms of academic dishonesty:

1. Plagiarism, e.g. the submission of work that is not one’s own or for which other credit has been obtained.

2. Improper collaboration in group work.

3. Copying or using unauthorized aids in tests and examinations.

Turnitin.com: In this course we will be using a web-based service (Turnitin.com) to reveal plagiarism. Students will be expected to submit their work electronically to Turnitin.com and in hard copy so that it can be checked for academic dishonesty. Students who do not wish to submit their work to Turnitin.com must still submit a copy to the  Field Course Leader. No penalty will be assigned to a student who does not submit work to Turnitin.com. All submitted work is subject to normal verification that standards of academic integrity have been upheld (e.g., on-line search, etc.). To see the Turnitin.com Policy, please go to www.mcmaster.ca/academicintegrity.

 

Acknowledgement of Course Policies

Your registration and continuous participation (e.g. on A2L, in the classroom, etc.) to the various learning activities of PEACE ST 4CF3 will be considered to be an implicit acknowledgement of the course policies outlined above, or of any other that may be announced during lecture and/or on A2L. It is your responsibility to read this course outline, to familiarize yourself with the course policies and to act accordingly.

Lack of awareness of the course policies cannot be invoked at any point during this course for failure to meet them. It is your responsibility to ask for clarification on any policies that you do not understand.

The  Field Course Leader reserves the right to modify elements of the course and will notify students accordingly (in class and post any changes to the course A2L). The lecture schedule is only a guideline and may be modified during the course of the class.

The  Field Course Leader and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of the student to check their McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any change.

 

Course Modification Statement

The Field Course Leader and university reserve the right to modify elements of the course during the term. The university may change the dates and deadlines for any or all courses in extreme circumstances. If either type of modification becomes necessary, reasonable notice and communication with the students will be given with explanation and the opportunity to comment on changes. It is the responsibility of the student to check his/her McMaster email and course websites weekly during the term and to note any changes.

 

Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities

Students who require academic accommodation must contact Student Accessibility Services (SAS) to make arrangements with a Program Coordinator. Academic accommodations must be arranged for each term of study. Student Accessibility Services can be contacted by phone 905-525-9140 ext. 28652 or e-mail sas@mcmaster.ca. For further information, consult McMaster University’s Policy for Academic Accommodation of Students with Disabilities